Is CrossFit Right For You?

SHOULD YOU CROSSFIT?

CrossFit is no longer a form of exercise performed in small gyms; it is a phenomenon that has taken the world by storm. At its roots, CrossFit is a popular form of exercise utilizing high-intensity fitness programming that incorporates elements from many disciplines: including weightlifting, traditional cardiovascular exercise (running, jumping rope, biking, rowing), and basic gymnastic movements. The sport has grown to an international stage and the sport’s most elite athletes perform once a year at the popular televised CrossFit Games. Originally CrossFit started as a gym in Santa Cruz, CA and evolved into an online blog that offered free programming to anyone; with its growth CrossFit is now known worldwide for both the “Sport of Fitness” and as a training methodology.

 

HOW DO I KNOW IF I AM READY:

CrossFit is a challenge for even the most experienced and fit of athletes. That being said, the untrained or unfit should not shy away. Many CrossFit ‘boxes’ (the name for a CrossFit gym) offer a 6-week beginners’ class to gradually work you into the sport and safely introduce you to the movements. Movements performed in CrossFit can be scaled to a reasonable level of difficulty which can be completed by any individual at any fitness level. This allows Olympic athletes, grandmothers, and beginners to work out side by side. For example, if you cannot do a pull-up, coaches would have you stand on a box under the bar where you would utilize your leg strength to offset using just your arms; making the task of a pull-up easier.

 

ENVIRONMENT:

CrossFit boxes have a supportive community of members who are always encouraging throughout workouts and are always willing to share their personal progress story. Each box ‘gym’ has its own personality, which is feel based on the personas of the members. Although each box is different, they all have one common theme of providing a positive environment for each participant and encourage the improvement an individual’s fitness and function.

SAFETY:

CrossFit has been in the news since 2005 regarding the safety of the sport. Two common CrossFit misinterpretations are: the movements are too hard leading to injuries, and the coaches teaching classes are not properly educated. These statements are false. CrossFit routines contain movements that would be risky for anyone with a preexisting injury to perform, but that is the case with every sport. Research of peer-reviewed literature provides statistics stating CrossFit has a significantly lower injury risk than running and a similar injury risk to Olympic lifting, gymnastics, and powerlifting. Below is a chart visualizing the injury rates of 1000 hours of training per sport:

With the evidence of the aforementioned, done correctly, CrossFit is a safe choice. Let us now move onto the CrossFit Coach. To become a CrossFit coach, one must go through a comprehensive certification process. This process has received criticism by some over the past 4-5 years for not being rigorous enough, even though, a CrossFit coach must attend a 2-day course followed by an in-person examination. The two goals of the course are;

  1. To provide attendees with the knowledge to use CrossFit Methodologies successfully for themselves.
  2. To provide attendees with initial and foundational education to begin training others using CrossFit.

 

Despite the critique of the CrossFit Coach certification process, CrossFit certification programs require in-person attendance of a live course and demonstrate the ability to perform the movements. In comparison, to be certified as a personal trainer through some of the more popular associations such as ACE, NASM, NCSF, and ASCM only require a home study course and an online exam. This provides evidence that CrossFit is more hands on in their certification process and requires coaches to have the ability to perform and teach movements safely and correctly.

 

FREE CLASSES:

Becoming a member at a CrossFit box is expensive, but there are other options to get your toes wet in the sport. Some CrossFit boxes offer a “Sweaty Saturday” workout that is free to the general public. Many of the Sweaty Saturday classes are designed for individuals with no prior lifting experience and do not incorporate Olympic lifts or power lifts. The typical Sweaty Saturday is a mix of cardiovascular exercise and general strength training. Check with your local CrossFit affiliated box for details.

CROSSFIT FROM A PHYSICAL THERAPIST PERSPECTIVE:

CrossFit is an exciting sport that can be performed with a injury risk no higher than many popular sports. The key is to ease into the sport like you would any other sport. An individual cannot go from little exercise to playing 15 hours of tennis a week and be surprised when they get a tennis elbow injury. It is my opinion, as a physical therapist and CrossFit athlete, that CrossFit is a great activity to participate in if you are healthy enough for exercise. That being said, I am 100% for each individual finding any activity that gets them up and moving! Before beginning any new physical activity routine, it is suggested that you first consult with your physician.

 

AUTHOR:

Dr. “Ted” Edward S. Greeley II, P.T., D.P.T., C.S.C.S. is a physical therapist at Riverview Physical Therapy in Westbrook, ME. He enjoys CrossFit because of the internal competition the sport provides for him to better himself. When outside of

patient care or CrossFit, Ted enjoys skiing, rock climbing, ice hockey, and passing on his love of the outdoors to his son. He also enjoys attending conferences and courses to stay up to date with the newest research in his field.

ARTICLE RESOURCES: The Epidemiology of Injuries Across the Weight-Training Sports – Sports Med. 2017 www.fitnesspainfree.com

Running Injuries. A review of the Epidemiology Literature – Sports Med.

1992https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1439399

Incidence of Running-Related Injuries Per 1000 h of running in Different Types of Runners: A Systematic Review and Meta- Analysis – Sports Med. 2015 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4473093/

Quantifying the risk of sports injury: a systematic review of activity‐specific rates for children under 16 years of age – British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2007 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2465389/

CrossFit course website https://training.crossfit.com/

American Academy on Exercise websitehttps://www.acefitness.org/fitness certifications/default.aspx

Greg Knapton

Greg Knapton, PT, ATC, Partner
Clinic Director - Westbrook

Greg, a native of Westbrook, earned his physical therapy degree from the University of Vermont in 1992. Greg also completed a fellowship in Sports Medicine through the American Sports Medicine Institute in 1998 and has been a certified athletic trainer since 2000. He is currently the owner of Riverview Physical Therapy, established in 2002, with locations in Bath, Westbrook, Windham and Yarmouth. Riverview PT also provides Athletic Training services at both Westbrook and Yarmouth High Schools, averaging 30 hours/week during the school year.

As a runner himself, Greg has first-hand knowledge of the demands running puts on the body. Through his own experience and that of his patients, Greg has developed the necessary skills and knowledge to assist all levels of runners returning to their sport. In addition to treating patients, Greg regularly teaches runners & triathletes at area companies and specialty retail stores about injury prevention, warm-up and cool-down techniques, proper footwear and how to avoid and care for some of the most common injuries. When not treating patients, Greg enjoys running and spending time with his wife Karen and their three boys.

'Ted' Edward S. Greeley II

"Ted" Edward S. Greeley II, PT, DPT, CSCS

What led you to become a PT?

I am one of the few therapists I know that did not receive any physical therapy as an athlete through my youth. I first attended college for mechanical engineering and wanted to find a career that kept me active through the day but still challenged my mechanical mind. I eventually made my way to the career I love.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I treat the whole body and multiple body systems not just the area that hurts. The main dysfunction is often not the pain location. I try to make therapy fun and have some laughs on the road to recovery.

What do you like to do outside of work?

Spending time with my wife and kids in the outdoors preferably hiking, camping, disc golf, hunting, or attending my kids sports games.

Catherine Heath

Catherine Heath, DPT

What led you to become a PT?

Fascination with the human body and its response to exercise led me to physical therapy. I was originally interested in professional coaching but then found I was more interested in rehabilitation.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I gear every treatment plan towards an individual’s fitness level to aid them with meeting their personal goals. We are all unique individuals; therefore, your treatment should be unique to you. As an endurance athlete, I know the importance of proper care and training.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I enjoy a variety of outdoor activities Maine has to offer: hiking, camping, biking, rock climbing and skiing. I’m an avid triathlete and compete in long-distance running events.

Derek Milone

Derek Milone, MS, PT

What led you to become a PT?

I found myself injured frequently as a high school athlete which naturally landed me in a physical therapy office. I experienced the healing effects that a seasoned therapist can provide. I also noticed that all the physical therapists were having fun. This led me to pursue PT in college and here I am talking to you.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I have the ability to assess both the root cause of dysfunction and empower people to find their physical and mental strength. I partner with my patients to motivate them to reach their goals.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I like to stay active whether it is snowboarding, hiking, boating, taking in a car show or hanging out with my wife and kids. I am a weekend warrior car mechanic and you can find me in church on Sunday.

Nathaniel Runge

Nathaniel Runge, DPT

What led you to become a PT?

I was a second-year pre-med major with no occupation in mind. I knew I wanted a job that was hands on and interacted with people. After shadowing many medical positions, I knew PT was the one for me.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

Both my patient and I can often forget we’re doing work during our interaction because we slip a lot of fun and music appreciation in with my comprehensive PT program. And at day’s end, I think to myself, “Oh, yeah, I have to document this!”

What do you like to do outside of work?

I have three daughters under the age of 10 so much of my life focuses around them. When I am not contributing to all the interactions of family life, I am volunteering for various coaching positions.

Nancy Crawford

Nancy Crawford, PT
Clinic Director - Windham

What led you to become a PT?

My interest in Physical Therapy began in High School. At the time, I was exploring possible career paths that would blend my love for science and desire to work with people. I quickly found that Physical Therapy was the ideal blend of my interests. After over 20 plus years of PT, I have not regretted my decision. I continue to find it to be a satisfying and interesting profession.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I offer over 20 years of experience, not only in outpatient orthopedics but also in rehabilitation of neurological disorders. I regularly attend continuing education classes to keep my skills current and innovative. We have a strong team approach at Riverview and work together to improve our patients’ function and minimize pain.

What do you like to do outside of work?

On the weekends, I can usually be found doing some kind of activity in the outdoors. I enjoy hiking, skiing, cycling and kayaking.

Jodi Mitchell

Jodi Mitchell, PTA, ATC

Coming soon...
Matt Douglas

Matt Douglass, PT

Coming soon...
Chris Heuss

Christine Dube, PT

What led you to become a PT?

A friend of the family who had a background in physical education led me into it. He was working with a chiropractor, I shadowed him and found that I liked being in the medical field.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I think sometimes people are very fearful when they come in for physical therapy. I try to get to know them outside of the injury and that leads to developing a good plan of care.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I enjoy cooking and hanging out with friends, watching my kids play volleyball, paddle boarding, snowshoeing and walking my dog.

Michael Viricel

Michael Viricel, MSPT, CSCS

What led you to become a PT?

Growing up, I was always enjoyed math and science classes. In high school, I took an Anatomy and Physiology class, which sparked my interest in pursuing a career in a health-related profession. I wasn't sure which direction to take when looking at colleges, so I applied to multiple schools with different choices of major. I settled on Husson College and chose Physical Therapy as my major. The choice was made based on being able to live at home and maintain a part-time job while in school. I was not sure how much I would enjoy Physical Therapy when I started, but once I got into science and anatomy classes, I was hooked.

What motivates you professionally?

I really love when I can improve a patient’s quality of life and return them to pain-free functional mobility. I know I've done my job well when a former client refers family and friends to me. That’s what keeps me motivated in continuing my career as a physical therapist.

Chris Heuss

Chris Heuss, PT
Clinic Director - Bath

What led you to become a PT?

I was working as a counselor and advocate for adults with disabilities and I saw the significant benefit that occurred when I took my clients to their physical therapy sessions and I thought, “I want to be a physical therapist.”

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I’m very good at listening to my patients and finding out their personal goals. People seem to feel really comfortable hanging out with me and our clinic has a very friendly environment.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I like the outdoors so backpacking, kayaking and, more recently, I’ve taken up rock climbing. I like to hike in the White Mountains and the Katahdin region, and I am most happy when I’m doing this with my wife and two teenage boys.

Carrie Mitchell

Carrie Mitchell, ATC & PTA

What led you to become a physical therapist assistant?

I wanted to pursue a medically based profession. Also, I've always been interested in sports/health, so athletic training/sports medicine and physical therapy were a logical choice.

What makes you a great assistant to work with?

I have been in my career since 1990, so I do have years of experience on my side. My first job out of college allowed me to work in an environment that fostered forward-thinking and learning. I was lucky enough to work with many exceptional clinicians, one of whom is the owner of Riverview. I feel so lucky to work in a profession I love and am able to constantly learn and grow in.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I enjoy teaching Vinyasa Flow yoga and have for 4 years. I love trail running at our local land preserve all year round. My husband and two chocolate labs also love skiing, hiking and boating. We have lived in the Midcoast for 24 years and love every minute of it!

Hallee

Hallee Breton, DPT

What led you to become a PT?
I grew up dancing with a focus in ballet and always had an appreciation for the human body and human movement. I learned how to use certain muscles in my body to create very specific movements and developed acute sense for body awareness which translates perfectly to physical therapy practice. I was always interested in medical sciences and knew I didn't want to have a desk job so physical therapy was a perfect fit!
With all the PT's available, why should a patient choose you?
I love getting to know people. I really try to understand people and the lives they lead and incorporate that in how I evaluate and treat my patients. Everyone is different and going through different challenges in their lives and I try to be a support for them for their physical and mental health. Plus I like to have a good time with my patients!
What do you like to do outside of work?
I am an avid snowboarder in the winter; Sugarloaf is my mountain! And in the spring and summer, I love going camping, hiking, and have taken up golfing. I love being outdoors in any way, shape, or form.
Greg Knapton

Greg Knapton, PT, ATC, Partner
Clinic Director - Westbrook

Greg, a native of Westbrook, earned his physical therapy degree from the University of Vermont in 1992. Greg also completed a fellowship in Sports Medicine through the American Sports Medicine Institute in 1998 and has been a certified athletic trainer since 2000. He is currently the owner of Riverview Physical Therapy, established in 2002, with locations in Bath, Westbrook, Windham and Yarmouth. Riverview PT also provides Athletic Training services at both Westbrook and Yarmouth High Schools, averaging 30 hours/week during the school year.

As a runner himself, Greg has first-hand knowledge of the demands running puts on the body. Through his own experience and that of his patients, Greg has developed the necessary skills and knowledge to assist all levels of runners returning to their sport. In addition to treating patients, Greg regularly teaches runners & triathletes at area companies and specialty retail stores about injury prevention, warm-up and cool-down techniques, proper footwear and how to avoid and care for some of the most common injuries. When not treating patients, Greg enjoys running and spending time with his wife Karen and their three boys.

'Ted' Edward S. Greeley II

"Ted" Edward S. Greeley II, PT, DPT, CSCS

What led you to become a PT?

I am one of the few therapists I know that did not receive any physical therapy as an athlete through my youth. I first attended college for mechanical engineering and wanted to find a career that kept me active through the day but still challenged my mechanical mind. I eventually made my way to the career I love.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I treat the whole body and multiple body systems not just the area that hurts. The main dysfunction is often not the pain location. I try to make therapy fun and have some laughs on the road to recovery.

What do you like to do outside of work?

Spending time with my wife and kids in the outdoors preferably hiking, camping, disc golf, hunting, or attending my kids sports games.

Catherine Heath

Catherine Heath, DPT

What led you to become a PT?

Fascination with the human body and its response to exercise led me to physical therapy. I was originally interested in professional coaching but then found I was more interested in rehabilitation.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I gear every treatment plan towards an individual’s fitness level to aid them with meeting their personal goals. We are all unique individuals; therefore, your treatment should be unique to you. As an endurance athlete, I know the importance of proper care and training.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I enjoy a variety of outdoor activities Maine has to offer: hiking, camping, biking, rock climbing and skiing. I’m an avid triathlete and compete in long-distance running events.

Derek Milone

Derek Milone, MS, PT

What led you to become a PT?

I found myself injured frequently as a high school athlete which naturally landed me in a physical therapy office. I experienced the healing effects that a seasoned therapist can provide. I also noticed that all the physical therapists were having fun. This led me to pursue PT in college and here I am talking to you.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I have the ability to assess both the root cause of dysfunction and empower people to find their physical and mental strength. I partner with my patients to motivate them to reach their goals.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I like to stay active whether it is snowboarding, hiking, boating, taking in a car show or hanging out with my wife and kids. I am a weekend warrior car mechanic and you can find me in church on Sunday.

Nathaniel Runge

Nathaniel Runge, DPT

What led you to become a PT?

I was a second-year pre-med major with no occupation in mind. I knew I wanted a job that was hands on and interacted with people. After shadowing many medical positions, I knew PT was the one for me.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

Both my patient and I can often forget we’re doing work during our interaction because we slip a lot of fun and music appreciation in with my comprehensive PT program. And at day’s end, I think to myself, “Oh, yeah, I have to document this!”

What do you like to do outside of work?

I have three daughters under the age of 10 so much of my life focuses around them. When I am not contributing to all the interactions of family life, I am volunteering for various coaching positions.

Nancy Crawford

Nancy Crawford, PT
Clinic Director - Windham

What led you to become a PT?

My interest in Physical Therapy began in High School. At the time, I was exploring possible career paths that would blend my love for science and desire to work with people. I quickly found that Physical Therapy was the ideal blend of my interests. After over 20 plus years of PT, I have not regretted my decision. I continue to find it to be a satisfying and interesting profession.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I offer over 20 years of experience, not only in outpatient orthopedics but also in rehabilitation of neurological disorders. I regularly attend continuing education classes to keep my skills current and innovative. We have a strong team approach at Riverview and work together to improve our patients’ function and minimize pain.

What do you like to do outside of work?

On the weekends, I can usually be found doing some kind of activity in the outdoors. I enjoy hiking, skiing, cycling and kayaking.

Jodi Mitchell

Jodi Mitchell, PTA, ATC

Coming soon...
Matt Douglas

Matt Douglass, PT

Coming soon...
Chris Heuss

Christine Dube, PT

What led you to become a PT?

A friend of the family who had a background in physical education led me into it. He was working with a chiropractor, I shadowed him and found that I liked being in the medical field.

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I think sometimes people are very fearful when they come in for physical therapy. I try to get to know them outside of the injury and that leads to developing a good plan of care.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I enjoy cooking and hanging out with friends, watching my kids play volleyball, paddle boarding, snowshoeing and walking my dog.

Michael Viricel

Michael Viricel, MSPT, CSCS

What led you to become a PT?

Growing up, I was always enjoyed math and science classes. In high school, I took an Anatomy and Physiology class, which sparked my interest in pursuing a career in a health-related profession. I wasn't sure which direction to take when looking at colleges, so I applied to multiple schools with different choices of major. I settled on Husson College and chose Physical Therapy as my major. The choice was made based on being able to live at home and maintain a part-time job while in school. I was not sure how much I would enjoy Physical Therapy when I started, but once I got into science and anatomy classes, I was hooked.

What motivates you professionally?

I really love when I can improve a patient’s quality of life and return them to pain-free functional mobility. I know I've done my job well when a former client refers family and friends to me. That’s what keeps me motivated in continuing my career as a physical therapist.

Chris Heuss

Chris Heuss, PT
Clinic Director - Bath

What led you to become a PT?

I was working as a counselor and advocate for adults with disabilities and I saw the significant benefit that occurred when I took my clients to their physical therapy sessions and I thought, “I want to be a physical therapist.”

With all of the PTs available, why should a patient choose you?

I’m very good at listening to my patients and finding out their personal goals. People seem to feel really comfortable hanging out with me and our clinic has a very friendly environment.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I like the outdoors so backpacking, kayaking and, more recently, I’ve taken up rock climbing. I like to hike in the White Mountains and the Katahdin region, and I am most happy when I’m doing this with my wife and two teenage boys.

Carrie Mitchell

Carrie Mitchell, ATC & PTA

What led you to become a physical therapist assistant?

I wanted to pursue a medically based profession. Also, I've always been interested in sports/health, so athletic training/sports medicine and physical therapy were a logical choice.

What makes you a great assistant to work with?

I have been in my career since 1990, so I do have years of experience on my side. My first job out of college allowed me to work in an environment that fostered forward-thinking and learning. I was lucky enough to work with many exceptional clinicians, one of whom is the owner of Riverview. I feel so lucky to work in a profession I love and am able to constantly learn and grow in.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I enjoy teaching Vinyasa Flow yoga and have for 4 years. I love trail running at our local land preserve all year round. My husband and two chocolate labs also love skiing, hiking and boating. We have lived in the Midcoast for 24 years and love every minute of it!

Hallee

Hallee Breton, DPT

What led you to become a PT?
I grew up dancing with a focus in ballet and always had an appreciation for the human body and human movement. I learned how to use certain muscles in my body to create very specific movements and developed acute sense for body awareness which translates perfectly to physical therapy practice. I was always interested in medical sciences and knew I didn't want to have a desk job so physical therapy was a perfect fit!
With all the PT's available, why should a patient choose you?
I love getting to know people. I really try to understand people and the lives they lead and incorporate that in how I evaluate and treat my patients. Everyone is different and going through different challenges in their lives and I try to be a support for them for their physical and mental health. Plus I like to have a good time with my patients!
What do you like to do outside of work?
I am an avid snowboarder in the winter; Sugarloaf is my mountain! And in the spring and summer, I love going camping, hiking, and have taken up golfing. I love being outdoors in any way, shape, or form.
Nathaniel Horton

Nathaniel Horton, PT, DPT

What led you to become a PT?

Both of my parents were teachers, and my original plan was to become a math teacher myself. However, I developed a passion for learning about the human body, injuries, and performance during my senior year of high school after a running injury ended my cross‐country career early. I switched from running to weightlifting but encountered repeated shoulder and back injuries that limited my ability to make progress. Through these experiences, I learned that the way your body feels can profoundly impact the rest of your life, for better or for worse. The summer before starting college, I switched my degree plan from math education to exercise science and pre‐physical therapy, and the rest is history. The best part is that I still get to be a teacher, because teaching others how to feel better is the most rewarding part of my job.

With all the PT's available, why should a patient choose you?

My priority for each patient is that they feel heard and respected. Nobody knows your body better than you do, and your input is of utmost importance throughout the physical therapy episode of care. I work hard to provide individualized and holistic treatments to each patient, and to serve primarily as a guide on the journey of healing.

What do you like to do outside of work?

My wife and I moved to Maine in May of 2021 because we love spending time outdoors and wanted to live somewhere that felt like a community. We are always looking for new trails and places to explore around Maine, as well as new activities and events. Some of my favorite activities include running, hiking, weightlifting, and recreational sports such as pick-up basketball and disc golf.

Matthew

Matthew O'Brien, PT, DPT

What led you to become a PT?

I decided to become a physical therapist when I had a severe hip injury resulting in surgery when I was 15. I was told by multiple doctors that running and sports were out of the question for my future. Since exercise and movement are integral to who I am as a person, this was devastating. Thankfully I was set up with a physical therapist who not only helped me recover, but helped me return to running and sport so that I could compete throughout my entire education without issue. That therapist helped give me that part of my life back and I want to do the same for others.

What makes you a great PT to work with?

As a therapist, I strive to provide an approachable and positive atmosphere for my patients to help develop a working relationship with their individual needs and goals in mind. My education and passion for movement are what motivate me to stay as current as possible on research and seeking new ways to help others help themselves.

What do you like to do outside of work?

When I am not in clinic I am doing anything outside: mountain and trail running, hiking, backpacking, skiing, biking, and paddling with my fiancé and my three dogs. Anything that involves fresh air and moving!

Morgan Segale

Morgan Segale, DPT

What led you to become a PT?

Ever since I was a kid I have been involved in sports. From pre-K soccer to a three season athlete in high school and eventually playing rugby at Stonehill College. I was always drawn to sciences in school but it wasn’t until being a lab assistant for anatomy and physiology that I realized how to merge my love for sports with my passion for science and the human body.

What makes you a great PT to work with?

I enjoy meeting and making new connections with people and it’s a plus that I get to help people feel better while doing so! I strive to take a full body approach to treatments taking into consideration individualized goals and outcomes.

What do you like to do outside of work?

On my free time I enjoy spending time outside with our two dogs, Tito and Jax. In the summer you’ll find me paddle boarding, hiking and camping and in the winter on the ski slopes

Kayla Hernderson

Kayla Henderson, PTA

What led you to become a physical therapist assistant?

I knew that I wanted to be in the field for a long time. I love working with people and helping them get better, reaching the goals that they may have thought were out of reach; getting back to things that they may have thought were out of the question again. After earning my bachelor's degree, I took some time off and after a few years decided to go back to school to achieve my goal, and I was able to do it without any more student load debt!

What makes you a great assistant to work with?

I feel like I am personable and can connect with people easily. I am very compassionate, and that really helps people feel more comfortable. I like to talk and find out what their interests are so I can connect on a personal level as well. I am very confident in my skills and that translates through my treatments.

What do you like to do outside of work?

I spend a lot of time with my kids; but when I get time I love to cook and bake; our menu generally includes one new recipe per week. I also do a lot of sewing. Most recently I have made reusable zipper snack bags.